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SUV Dealers

There are variety of sizes and styles to choose from when selecting your sport utility vehicle. Details will vary among different car manufacturers, but generally SUV dealers will offer four size options: compact, mid-size, full-size, and hybrid. Compact is the smallest size option, featuring two to three rows of seats and plenty of cargo space. This option is ideal for buyers who are interested in sporty transportation that offers a bit more room than a sedan. Mid-size SUV’s are capable of seating up to seven individuals, but maintain maneuverability and sportiness. The largest option is full-size. This designation refers to vehicles designed for large families, seating from eight to ten passengers, or for towing purposes. The newest edition to the SUV family is the hybrid. Hybrids are around the size of compacts, but they feature gas or electric drivetrains. This allows you to appreciate the advantages of a sport utility vehicle, while alleviating one of the major drawbacks to owning a bigger car–gas consumption.

Once you’ve narrowed your options, it’s time to start visiting SUV dealers. Visit multiple dealerships and be sure to research prices and financing options ahead of time. There is always room for negotiation when making your purchase, so it is helpful to have a prospective selling price in mind. In most cases, negotiating is the most stressful part of buying a new car. Use the following tips to ensure you pay a reasonable price:

Set a Limit

When financing, it can be easy to be persuaded into paying to a slightly higher quote than expected. Know the maximum amount you’re willing to spend before you visit any SUV dealers and do not budge. If a dealer won’t meet your price, move on to the next dealership.

Focus on Selling Price

Some sellers will try to negotiate your monthly payment, but it’s beneficial to look at the bigger picture. A low monthly payments, does not necessarily indicate a reasonable selling price. Keep your focus on the bottom line when negotiating.

Wait for Counter Offer

If the dealer says no to your first offer, don’t immediately make another. Always wait for a counter offer. This will allow you to better gauge negotiations. The salesman has a lowest offer and you can bet he doesn’t start the negation with it, so be prepared for some back-and-forth.

Raise Offer Slowly

Never raise your offer by more than $250-$300 at a time. If you raise your bid in small increments, you’ll be far less likely to overshoot your opponent’s lowest price.